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Created 2015-11-02
Owner sandywang5230
Title Blatter's resignation this week is the first step
Description a troubling sense that the sum total of these may be much less reliable than we would have hoped.Again, none of this is to suggest that any or all of the FIFA defendants are in fact wrongfully accused. They may be; or, every one of them may be fully guilty of the mountain of corruption alleged by the government. It doesn't matter. The point is that because of the systematic distortions caused by the way the federal government builds FIFA-type cases, we'll never truly know with any confidence what really happened. That's a problem, and it's one of the government's own making.In the last fortnight we have seen the stark truth about Fifa. The body governing the game that means so much to so many around the world has faced appalling allegations that suggest it is absolutely riddled with corruption. Blatter's resignation this week is the first step on a long road to reform and we will do everything we can, together with our international partners, to help identify and prosecute FIFA Coins anyone guilty of wrongdoing and to clean up the game we love.But at the heart of Fifa is a lesson about tackling corruption that goes far deeper. Corruption at Fifa was not a surprise. For years it lined the pockets of those on the inside and was met with little more than a reluctant sigh. The world shied away from taking on the problem, until some brave British journalists and American lawyers showed that things really could change.The same is true of corruption the world over. Just as with Fifa, we know the problem is there, but there is something of an international taboo over pointing the finger and stirring up concerns. At international Summits, leaders meet to talk about aid, to discuss how to grow our economies and how to keep our people safe. But we just don't talk enough about corruption. This has got to change.Corruption is the cancer at the heart of so many of the problems we face around the world today. The migrants drowning in the Mediterranean are fleeing from corrupt African states. Our efforts to address global poverty are too often undermined by corrupt governments preventing people getting the revenues and benefits of growth that are rightfully theirs. Corruption undermines the wider global economy too. The World Economic Forum estimates that corruption adds 10% to business costs globally, while the World Bank believes some $1trillion is paid in bribes every year. Cutting corruption by just 10% could benefit the global economy by $380billion every year - substantially more than was estimated for the Doha Trade Round. While corruption costs the EU economy alone �120billion every year.Corruption doesn't just threaten our prosperity, it also undermines our security. Whether it is the abduction of schoolgirls in Nigeria or the recruitment of fighters to the Taliban and Islamic State, time and again ordinary people are drawn to extremist groups partly as a reaction to the oppression and corruption of their own governments.
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